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Friday, November 10, 2017

Sermon on the Mount (Lord's Prayer) - Part 2

This is part 2 of our look at the Sermon on the Mount. 

In part 1 we saw that this section of scripture was:
1. concerned with "the gospel of the kingdom"
2. given to the disciples and not the multitudes
3. meant for Israel and her future kingdom
The most-oft quoted section of the sermon is the so-called "Lord's Prayer" in Chapter 6:9-12
‘Our Father in heaven,
hallowed be your name,
your kingdom come,
your will be done,
on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us today our daily bread.
And forgive us our debts,
as we also have forgiven our debtors.
And lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from the evil one.’
We've included it here in the context of the parables of the kingdom and the parables on the Olivet Discourse, Matthew 24-25 (the last part of the series).

On the Lord's calendar for Israel is "the great and dreadful day of the Lord." This is seen in the OT prophets and connected to the events and expectation in the Acts Age (such as Peter referencing Joel at Pentecost). We see it most clearly in the Revelation.
"On [the Day of the Lord] I was in the Spirit, and I heard behind me a loud voice like a trumpet."
-Rev 1:10

This will be a terrible time for Israel and it will flavor the Olivet Discourse and parables of Matt 24-25 ("the end of the age").

The Lord's Prayer is the disciples and true Israel looking forward to the kingdom of the promised millennium for Israel (1000 years, Rev 20) to come to earth. But there will be terrible times during the Great Tribulation preceding that age. Hence, the plea for "daily bread."

The section on forgiving is expanded by the Lord in the two verses following the prayer:

"For if you forgive other people when they sin against you, your heavenly Father will also forgive you. But if you do not forgive others their sins, your Father will not forgive your sins."
-Matt 6:13-14

As we will see in regard to the question of the end of the age and the coming of the Lord in Matthew 24-25, faithfulness during that time will be judged. Part of the judgment will be the judgment of the nations on how they treat Jews and Jews how they treat each other. This is forerunner of the Magna Carta of the millennium where righteousness will be strictly enforced, with mercy.

If you read the Sermon on the Mount carefully, you will find a very high standard. That is another study for another time. For now, we will leave it in its place.

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